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Housing Solutions for Adults with Autism | Autism Key
 

 
 

Housing Solutions for Adults with Autism


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While raising a child with autism is a day to day journey, in the back of every parent’s mind is what level of independence their child will eventually achieve. Where and how will they live?

Lately, I’ve been coming across articles about concerned parents coming together to generate living spaces for their children. In Canada, a group of parents designed an apartment house for their young adults on the spectrum to dwell in, complete with quarters for live-in aides. It enjoyed underwriting by the Canadian government, but unfortunately stalled due to the economic downturn. The parents still vow to replace promised funds and see the finished architectural renderings become a dream home for their children.

In Asheville, North Carolina, Jesse Willis, aged 29, is severely autistic yet lives in a house with two roommates and holds down a restaurant job. Independence from his parents was once thought an impossibility, but the three men’s parents bought the house and the Autism Society of North Carolina pays for the live-in staff that provide their around-the-clock oversight. The community is embracing Jesse and he enjoys a good life, a life his parent’s never dared dream for him.

Strength obviously springs from families of adults on the autism spectrum coming together to generate workable solutions. The collaboration between (albeit it undependable) government and families and the partnership between families and state autism societies are exciting aspects of these stories. 

The weakness lies in a parent who cannot afford to kick in financially for their child’s housing. Their economic stake should be provided by a foundation or charity so that they too can participate in this creative problem solving. 

With my sons having just started high school, their transition to adulthood is moving from the back burner to the front. Now, I’m thinking over who they could live communally with, what level of support they would need and what groups are available within the community to participate in a plan. It’s good to be able to think creatively about the next phase of their lives instead of merely experiencing apprehension over their futures.

7 Responses to Housing Solutions for Adults with Autism

  1. PC says:

    What if you are a 47 yo Adult on the Spectrum, with Many Family, Friends, Employers, Medical Professionals who Hurt You Bwcause You Look Too Normal, Pretty, PERFECT on the Outside??? All its gotten Me is Sexual Molestation, Physical, Psychological, Mental and Emotional, Medical, Academic and Societal Abuse. I’m Black, borne and raosed in NYC, the WORST place on Earth for Someone like me, force to Live in my Own Apt. In my 88 yo grandmother house where my 70 yo mother lives because I’ve been Unfairly laidoff for 28 Months and I have No Where to Go. Family is supposed to Love You! What About Me?

  2. Susan says:

    I’m so sorry to hear of your plight. Being in Seattle, I know nothing of NYC, but I’m going to see if I can find any resources for you. I’ll get back to you…Susan Moffitt

  3. Susan says:

    Since you have Autism Speaks right there, you can call them and ask for help. (212) 252-8584

    good luck…SM

  4. PC says:

    Believe Me, I tried Speaking with Austism Speaks. Was made to sit as a “Subjrct”, once again, this time by the Director and Leader of the Autism “Science Ambassadors”, Dr. Daniel Lighfoot, a MICRO-Biologist, 2 years with AS, out of CA, and only interested in engaging in me a 3-hour, No Lie, phone conversation, last week Friday, 4/8, because People, even Those working Within The Spectrum, Still think I’m a Joke, to be used like a Guinea Pig because I Sound Too Agressive, Articulate, Intellectual, “Like A Smarty Pants” and Yes, that was His exact remake after 2 hours! When I get it All together, my Writing, which I’ve been doing All over the Palce, and get over my Shyness in Public and Fear of Men, who keep putting their hands on Me in Public because I have a Pretty Face and Black American Women, which is a Culture, and which I am Not, are part of, are “perceived” a certain way, I AM SPEAKING LOUDER for Autism and I Am NOT Going to Shut My Mouth! Thank you for your Help. I have gotten more kindness from the Help of Strnagers, since I was a Child, and mostly from White People, which is Also a Culture! God Bless you Susan. Your the 2nd Susan to help me. The 1st has an Angel of an Autistic Son. We are All Autistic Angels and its Not just about the Boys!!! TY!

  5. olga torres says:

    MY NAME IS OLGA TORRES. I AM A SINGLE PARENT OF TWO KIDS. ONE IS 11 YEARS OLD AND I HAVE A FOUR YEAR. HE WILL BE FIVE NEXT MONTH. MY SON HAS AUTISM. IM LOOKING FOR A LOW INCOME APARTMENT. IM NOT WRKING RIGHT NOW. MY SON IS ON SSI. WHERE CAN I GET THE HELP AND SUPPORT. THANK YOU. YOU COULD E MAIL ME BACK.

  6. jason says:

    I’m 17 and I have autism at a minor level thats at least what my mom says but she doesn’t see everything that I do. I have trouble doing lots of things but my mom really doesn’t think theres anything wrong and she said when i’m 18 I have to move out and I don’t have anywhere to go or a high school dipolma. What should I do?

  7. Susan says:

    It sounds like you’re in high school. Do you have an IEP (Individualized Education Plan)? If so your IEP team is responsible for making a good plan for your future. If not, you should visit your guidance counselor, tell him what you told me and ask for help preparing for your future.

    If you’re not in school you could call your local autism society and ask for help. Can you communicate with your mom? If so, tell her you need her help in moving forward. You and she both may benefit from a new website called autismafter16.com

    Good luck!!

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Did You Know?

  • * In 1970, Autism affected 1 out of 10,000 children
  • * Autism now affects 1 out of 88 children
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  • * 1.7 million Americans have some form of autism
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